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IMPORTANT: Easton's Bible Dictionary is NOT exegetical, and can be counter to the scriptural or Hebrew and Greek definitions of words.

 

150 Years ago you couldn't be a Pastor anywhere in the world unless you were fluent in Hebrew..... Even in the so-called "Dark Ages" everyone had a local Priest who could speak, read and write in at least 2 languages, who taught out of a Latin Bible. How far have we fallen in word definitions! DO YOU BELIEVE THE WORD OF GOD OR BELIEVE IN THE OPPOSITE? 

*******Recommended Materials for In-Depth Research of Scripture*********

Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, Complete and Unabridged (Every pastor uses or recommends this for their congregation)  It's the main tool every Christian should have in their library along with a good Lexicon to get full definitions.  Beware, using just Strong's alone without a Lexicon will not give you full definitions of many words since it's not meant to do the function of a Lexicon.  

You will need some of the following books to render in-depth research beyond the scope of Strong's Concordance:   (Most of which are included in several computer programs such as PC Study Bible and online at HERE for FREE ACCESS)

1. The New Englishman's Greek Concordance and Lexicon of the New Testament, by Wigram-Green *These two books by Wigram-Green are what Strong's concordance is based upon.  Every word in the bible is listed by (the original Greek and Hebrew)Strongs# rather than by English translation.  You cannot miss the bible's definition of a word with this tool.  You can see how the original word is used every time throughout the bible.  This research tool makes any user blow away most any pastor these days.*

2.  The New Englishman's Hebrew Concordance of the Old Testament, by Wigram-Green 

3.  Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament by Thayers

4.  Hebrew-Chaldee Lexicon to the Old Testament by Gesenius

5. Interlinear Greek and English by Berry

6.  Young's Analytical Concordance to the Bible

7. Vine's Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words Keyed to Strong's Reference Numbers

You can also order the KJV "Hebrew Greek Key Study bible" which has built-in lexicons and Strong's numbering within the actual text of King James, or if you prefer you can also get it in New American Standard. (we reccomend King James Version)

We know you can always use the bible as it's own lexicon and use the word to interpret the word, however, but these are shortcuts for all who are wise to make quick use of. Thank You for using our online searchable Strong's concordance and dictionary.

You can get all these books at ANY Bible bookstore and most major bookstores. Or order from us right now click here

The first keys are finding what the bible's definition of a word is in scripture, not in 21st Century word definitions or MAJORITY Religious Doctrines in the broad path which leadeth to destruction.  These tools help you see how the original word is used through the entire text of scripture, thus render the BIBLE'S Definition of a word since we live by Every Word and not by bread alone.

Easton's (UnBiblical and sometimes FALSE) Bible Dictionary

 

Semei Genealogy of our Lord (Luk 3:26).

Senaah Thorny, a place many of the inhabitants of which returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Ezr 2:35; Neh 7:38).

Senate (Act 5:21), the "elders of Israel" who formed a component part of the Sanhedrin.

Seneh The acacia; rock-thorn, the southern cliff in the Wady es-Suweinit, a valley south of Michmash, which Jonathan climbed with his armour-bearer (Sa1 14:4, Sa1 14:5). The rock opposite, on the other side of the wady, was called Bozez.

Senir =Shenir, the name given to Hermon by the Amorites (Deu 3:9). It means "coat of mail" or "breastplate," and is equivalent to "Sirion." Some interpret the word as meaning "the prominent" or "the snowy mountain." It is properly the name of the central of the three summits of Hermon (q.v.).

Sennacherib Sin (the god) sends many brothers, son of Sargon, whom he succeeded on the throne of Assyria (705 B.C.), in the 23rd year of Hezekiah. "Like the Persian Xerxes, he was weak and vainglorious, cowardly under reverse, and cruel and boastful in success." He first set himself to break up the powerful combination of princes who were in league against him. Among these was Hezekiah, who had entered into an alliance with Egypt against Assyria. He accordingly led a very powerful army of at least 200,000 men into Judea, and devastated the land on every side, taking and destroying many cities (Kg2 18:13; compare Isa. 22, 24, 29, and Ch2 32:1). His own account of this invasion, as given in the Assyrian annals, is in these words: "Because Hezekiah, king of Judah, would not submit to my yoke, I came up against him, and by force of arms and by the might of my power I took forty-six of his strong fenced cities; and of the smaller towns which were scattered about, I took and plundered a countless number. From these places I took and carried off 200,156 persons, old and young, male and female, together with horses and mules, asses and camels, oxen and sheep, a countless multitude; and Hezekiah himself I shut up in Jerusalem, his capital city, like a bird in a cage, building towers round the city to hem him in, and raising banks of earth against the gates, so as to prevent escape Then upon Hezekiah there fell the fear of the power of my arms, and he sent out to me the chiefs and the elders of Jerusalem with 30 talents of gold and 800 talents of silver, and divers treasures, a rich and immense booty All these things were brought to me at Nineveh, the seat of my government." (Compare Isa 22:1 for description of the feelings of the inhabitants of Jerusalem at such a crisis.) Hezekiah was not disposed to become an Assyrian feudatory. He accordingly at once sought help from Egypt (Kg2 18:20). Sennacherib, hearing of this, marched a second time into Palestine (Kg2 18:17, Kg2 18:37; 19; Ch2 32:9; Isa. 36:2-22. Isa 37:25 should be rendered "dried up all the Nile-arms of Matsor," i.e., of Egypt, so called from the "Matsor" or great fortification across the isthmus of Suez, which protected it from invasions from the east). Sennacherib sent envoys to try to persuade Hezekiah to surrender, but in vain. (See TIRHAKAH.) He next sent a threatening letter (Kg2 19:10), which Hezekiah carried into the temple and spread before the Lord. Isaiah again brought an encouraging message to the pious king (Kg2 19:20). "In that night" the angel of the Lord went forth and smote the camp of the Assyrians. In the morning, "behold, they were all dead corpses." The Assyrian army was annihilated. This great disaster is not, as was to be expected, taken notice of in the Assyrian annals. Though Sennacherib survived this disaster some twenty years, he never again renewed his attempt against Jerusalem. He was murdered by two of his own sons (Adrammelech and Sharezer), and was succeeded by another son, Esarhaddon (681 B.C.), after a reign of twenty-four years.

Seorim Barley, the chief of the forth priestly course (Ch1 24:8).

Sephar Numbering, (Gen 10:30), supposed by some to be the ancient Himyaritic capital, "Shaphar," Zaphar, on the Indian Ocean, between the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea.

Sepharad (Oba 1:20), some locality unknown. The modern Jews think that Spain is meant, and hence they designate the Spanish Jews "Sephardim," as they do the German Jews by the name "Ashkenazim," because the rabbis call Germany Ashkenaz. Others identify it with Sardis, the capital of Lydia. The Latin father Jerome regarded it as an Assyrian word, meaning "boundary," and interpreted the sentence, "which is in Sepharad," by "who are scattered abroad in all the boundaries and regions of the earth." Perowne says: "Whatever uncertainty attaches to the word Sepharad, the drift of the prophecy is clear, viz., that not only the exiles from Babylon, but Jewish captives from other and distant regions, shall be brought back to live prosperously within the enlarged borders of their own land."

Sepharvaim Taken by Sargon, king of Assyria (Kg2 17:24; Kg2 18:34; Kg2 19:13; Isa 37:13). It was a double city, and received the common name Sepharvaim, i.e., "the two Sipparas," or "the two booktowns." The Sippara on the east bank of the Euphrates is now called Abu-Habba; that on the other bank was Accad, the old capital of Sargon I., where he established a great library. (See SARGON.) The recent discovery of cuneiform inscriptions at Tel el-Amarna in Egypt, consisting of official dispatches to Pharaoh Amenophis IV. and his predecessor from their agents in Palestine, proves that in the century before the Exodus an active literary intercourse was carried on between these nations, and that the medium of the correspondence was the Babylonian language and script. (See KIRJATH-SEPHER.)